2016 OSSA Annual Conference and Awards Banquet

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Gilliam County Sheriff Gary Bettencourt, Umatilla County Sheriff Terry Rowan, Clackamas County Sheriff Craig Roberts, Jefferson County Sheriff Jim Adkins, Crook County Sheriff John Gautney, Wheeler County Sheriff Chris Humphreys, Wasco County Sheriff Lane Magill, Washington County Sheriff Pat Garrett, Lane County Sheriff Byron Trapp, Morrow County Sheriff Ken Matlack, Malheur County Sheriff Brian Wolfe, Hood River County Sheriff Matt English, Harney County Sheriff Dave Ward, Douglas County Sheriff John Hanlin, Lincoln County Sheriff Curtis Landers, Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley, Deschutes County Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, Polk County Sheriff Mark Garton, Curry County Sheriff John Ward, Yamhill County Sheriff Tim Svenson, Baker County Sheriff Travis Ash, Marion County Sheriff Jason Myers, Tillamook County Sheriff Andy Long, Josephine County Sheriff Dave Daniel, Clatsop County Sheriff Tom Bergin

The Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association hosted the 2016 Annual Conference in Bend, Oregon, held December 4-8, 2016 at the Bend Riverhouse Hotel and Convention Center. There were approximately 260 Sheriffs and law enforcement professionals in attendance, along with 83 vendors, their equipment and personnel to staff their booth.

During the election of officers, Washington County Sheriff Pat Garrett was elected President, Hood River County Sheriff Matt English was elected Vice President and Clackamas County Sheriff Craig Roberts was elected Secretary for the 2017 year.

The customary business meetings, presentations, and updates were made to the attendees, all councils met, elected new officers and gave updates to the conference attendees throughout the conference. There were also updates given by representatives of the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC), Office of Designated Approving Authority (ODAA), Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST), Oregon State Police (OSP), Oregon Association of Chiefs of Police (OACP), Office of Emergency Management (OEM), United States Department of Justice (USDOJ), Western States Sheriffs’ Association (WSSA), Drone Training Center, Pacific Consulting and Investigations, and PowerDMS (a Policy Management Software).

Also at the conference was an All- Hazards Preparedness Workshop, facilitated by the Texas A&M Extension Service from the National Emergency Response and Rescue Training Center. This workshop provides a forum for local or regional executives to share strategies and coordinate plans for emergency preparedness and response. This is an efficient process for discussing executive-level issues with leaders from the agencies involved in all levels of the emergency management structure. The expected outcome: Executive and administrative staff, responder chiefs/ department heads and infrastructure and resource leaders sharing a common perspective and an understanding of the challenges they will face in times of crisis.


2016 Annual Awards Ceremony

Distinguished Service Award – This award is given to a member who in the performance of his or her duties performs an act of outstanding or especially meritorious service while demonstrating selflessness and devotion to duty.

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Sam Bates and Sheriff Gary Bettencourt, Gilliam County Sheriff ‘s Office

Gilliam County Sheriff’s Office
Deputy Sam Bates

Sam Bates receives this award for going above and beyond in his assistance with the search and rescue missions in Gilliam County. He has assisted in search and rescue, investigation into cattle rustling, searching for a wanted/ escaped fugitive, and numerous size-up flights for wildland fires. Mr. Bates has also transported numerous Gilliam County citizens to area hospitals where their family members have been medevacked, mostly after horrific motor vehicle crashes. He does this without question or compensation at significant cost, monetarily, to himself. Flying is a special service afforded to Gilliam County by Mr. Bates who often has self-dispatched to search and rescue missions after receiving “tone outs” in an attempt to narrow down search grids. Additionally, he routinely contacts other pilots via radio, to include air ambulance pilots, to direct them to exact locations of the lost or people needing medical attention in some of the most treacherous areas of Gilliam County along the John Day River. Mr. Bates’ flying these areas has saved numerous man hours and money for the Gilliam County Sheriff’s Office.

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Undersheriff Troy Clausen and Sheriff Jason Myers, Marion County Sheriff ‘s Office

Marion County Sheriff’s Office
Undersheriff Troy Clausen

Troy Clausen’s law enforcement career spans more than 26 years, with the last 19 years serving Marion County Sheriff’s Office. Troy currently serves as the undersheriff and is responsible for all operations of the Sheriff’s Office. In addition to his daily responsibilities, Troy is very active in the community serving on many boards and advisory committees. Over the last several years, Troy has presented to numerous law enforcement agencies the “Emotional Survival” training. It is his hope this will give public safety officials tools for a healthy mindset and balanced life. He has presented this class many times on behalf of the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association to the Deputy Sheriffs Academy, the Command College, and the New Sheriffs Institute. Over the last several years, Troy has always made himself available to present this class to any sheriff who has requested this training. Troy and his wife, Malissa, live in Salem and have three children.

General Counsel for the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association
Attorney Elmer Dickens

Elmer started his career in 1990 as a corrections officer in the maximum security Oregon State Penitentiary, including working in the disciplinary segregation/death row unit. After earning his Bachelor of Science and Juris Doctor degrees, he served over 17 years as the general counsel to the Washington County Sheriff’s Office. Elmer regularly advises on law enforcement operations, personnel issues, civil processes and correction issues. He has been a legal adviser for three elected sheriffs, and has been a member of the sheriff’s executive staff since 1999. Elmer serves as a lead instructor for the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association in numerous areas. He advises the Jail, Civil, and Enforcement Command Councils, and is the primary author and is responsible for updates to the Civil Manual and Jail Standards. He currently is also counsel for the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association. Elmer truly has a passion for the Sheriffs of Oregon, and is considered a friend among all of them.


Meritorious Service Award – This award is given for outstanding service over a period of years to their office or the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association.

Sheriff Craig Zanni and Jackie McDaniel, Coos County Sheriff 's Office

Sheriff Craig Zanni and Jackie McDaniel, Coos County Sheriff ‘s Office

Coos County Sheriff’s Office
Jackie McDaniel

Jacqueline McDaniel was hired in 2007 and took over all the duties of office manager and never looked back. She has performed the duties of this position with distinction and an impeccable work ethic. It is not possible to mention all the outstanding work and contributions Mrs. McDaniel has accomplished during her time at the Coos County Sheriff’s Office. She has worked tirelessly with the Sheriff’s Office command staff, trying to find ways to stretch the budget and fill the gaps in areas where funding had been reduced or eliminated. Mrs. McDaniel took it upon herself to create a new budget system assisting with clarification and transparency of funds and areas where they are distributed. This system was adopted by the entire county and has served as an invaluable tool while making budgets easy to understand for all county departments. It is not uncommon for deputies working swing shift, graveyard and weekends to see Mrs. McDaniel’s smiling face in her office diligently working on payroll, budgetary or office issues, while always placing the members of the department before her needs.

Mrs. McDaniel has never broken this trust, and a strong bond exists between her and every member of the Coos County Sheriff’s Office. This December Mrs. McDaniel will be retiring from the Coos County Sheriff’s Office. She has not only served as an office manager but as a supervisor, counselor, advisor, financial wizard and friend of many.


Distinguished Action Award – This award is given to a member who in the performance of his or her duties performs an act involving personal danger, or a highly credible, uncommon agency accomplishment which is performed under adverse conditions.

Deputy John Siemens, Sheriff John Hanlin and Deputy Brent Everett, Douglas County Sheriff 's Office

Deputy John Siemens, Sheriff John Hanlin and
Deputy Brent Everett, Douglas County Sheriff ‘s Office

Douglas County Sheriff’s Office
Deputies John Seimens and Brent Everett

On September 3, 2016, at approximately 8:30 p.m., Deputy John Siemens and Deputy Brent Everett were dispatched to a call which had been reported as a female who had been shot. Deputy Siemens arrived in the area and staged, waiting for back-up to arrive. While waiting, he noticed a vehicle parked a couple of hundred yards past the residence. The vehicle was “blacked out.” Deputy Siemens noticed the brake lights activate for just a second and then the vehicle took off at a high rate of speed, without headlights. Deputy Siemens figured this vehicle was related to the possible shooting/disturbance, so he went after it. The vehicle quickly turned into a driveway approximately 1/2 mile from the original location. Deputy Siemens activated his overhead lights.

The male driver, later identified as Travis Bean, began walking away from the vehicle, disobeying Deputy Siemens’ commands to stop and show him his hands. Bean was eventually detained by both deputies without further incident. It was later determined there was a .22 caliber rifle in the vehicle. Deputy Everett located two canisters of pepper spray and a stun gun in Bean’s left front pocket. Due to the circumstances and the possible need to render aid, Deputy Everett and Deputy Siemens returned with Bean to the initial residence to check the welfare of the residents. They located two deceased victims at the residence. Due to their efforts, this case was solved and a dangerous subject was taken off of the streets.

Deputy John Cooper, Sheriff Craig Zanni and Deputy Jonathan Boswell, Coos County Sheriff 's Office

Deputy John Cooper, Sheriff Craig Zanni and Deputy Jonathan Boswell, Coos County Sheriff ‘s Office

Coos County Sheriff’s Office
Deputies Jonathan Boswell and John Cooper

Deputies Boswell and Cooper responded to a disturbance in progress. Deputy Boswell peered into the residence and noticed a woman lying on the bed with an apparent injury. Deputy Boswell did not know if the woman was unconscious or sleeping, so he identified himself as a sheriff’s deputy from outside the residence and got the woman’s attention. At this time Deputy Boswell also noticed a large kitchen knife, “stabbed” into the floor in the kitchen area of the residence a short distance from the woman. Immediately after the woman was safely out of the residence, Deputy Boswell turned his attention back towards the interior of the residence and observed a man running towards him with two knives, one in each hand. Both Deputies Cooper and Boswell were being charged by the suspect at this point. Deputy Boswell recalled the suspect was yelling, “shoot me, shoot me!” Deputy Boswell’s verbal orders were not being obeyed, and he was running out of room to retreat. Deputy Boswell began to make the decision to fire at the suspect with deadly force. However, because the event was fluid, Deputy Cooper had not received the opportunity to completely remove the woman to a location away from the residence, causing her to be directly behind the suspect and in Deputy Boswell’s line of fire. Both deputies realized this and Deputy Cooper was able to step offline while Deputy Boswell continued to draw the attention and advance of the subject. Deputy Cooper successfully deployed his taser causing the suspect to fall to the ground while he was only feet from Deputy Boswell, still armed with the knives. Once on the ground, the knives were removed from the suspect and he was placed under arrest. Deputies Boswell and Cooper’s actions in this incident, while placing themselves in high personal danger, brought to an end a potentially deadly situation with no loss of life.


Life-Saving Award – This award is given to a member who in the performance of his or her duties performs an act of outstanding or especially meritorious service while demonstrating selflessness and devotion to duty.

Lincoln County Sheriff Curtis Landers and Deputy Eric Larson; Polk County Deputy Eric Berry and Sheriff Mark Garton

Lincoln County Sheriff Curtis Landers and Deputy Eric Larson; Polk County Deputy Eric Berry and Sheriff Mark Garton

Polk County Sheriff’s Office
Deputy Eric Berry
Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office
Deputy Eric Larson

On March 2nd, 2016 at about 9:30 a.m., Lincoln County Deputy Eric Larson was traveling from Lincoln County to attend a career fair at Western Oregon University. He was in Polk County, on Highway 223 about 10 miles south of Dallas when he observed an oncoming vehicle leave the shoulder of the roadway and collide with some trees. The vehicle immediately began smoking. Deputy Larson quickly turned around and went to the crash site. Deputy Larson was joined by Polk County Reserve Deputy Eric Berry (who is also a Polk County Public Works employee) who was also passing through the area. Fire and medical assistance were called, but the vehicle caught fire and immediate action was required. Deputy Larson and Deputy Berry discovered the vehicle damage and debris from the crash prevented quick access to the car, but after a couple of minutes they were able to finally force the door open and pull the driver to safety. Immediately after the deputies removed the driver from the car, the cabin of the vehicle became engulfed in flames, and two minutes later there was an explosion inside the vehicle. If it were not for Deputy Larson’s and Deputy Berry’s attentiveness and distinct actions at the scene by removing the driver, who was seriously injured and trapped inside his car as it began to erupt in flames, he would have perished.

Curry County Sheriff John Ward, Rocky Burns, Drew Harper and Luke Martinez

Curry County Sheriff John Ward, Rocky Burns, Drew Harper and Luke Martinez

Curry County Citizen
Luke Martinez, Rocky Burns, and Drew Harper

On October 9, 2016, these three men saved the lives of two other men who had capsized their boat in breaking surf at the mouth of the Rogue River, when there were no other viable resources to help at the time. Sergeant Ted Heath witnessed the incident and while preparing for the rescue, discovered the treacherous conditions of the bar made it too difficult to cross. The three local surfers saw what had happened and realized the boat that capsized was quickly being swept out to sea and to the south of the jetty with the two men clinging to it. Martinez, Burns and Harper paddled their surfboards through the breaking surf and reached the capsized boat and two men. By this time, one of the passengers of the boat was suffering from hypothermia. Martinez and Harper grabbed the man and started paddling to shore while Burns worked on getting the other passenger onto his surfboard and then back to the shore. Once back to the shore, the rescuers were assisted by other first responders. One male was transported by ambulance to the hospital, and the other refused medical treatment. These three men are credited with saving the lives of the men due to the treacherous bar conditions, when other means of getting to them would have been the difference between life and death.

Sergeant Erik Heikila, Deputy Christopher Younger, Deputy Joshua Brooks, Sergeant Michael Redding, Deputy Artur Artunyan, and Sheriff Mark Garton, Polk County Sheriff 's Office

Sergeant Erik Heikila, Deputy Christopher Younger, Deputy Joshua Brooks, Sergeant Michael Redding, Deputy Artur Artunyan, and Sheriff Mark Garton, Polk County Sheriff ‘s Office

Polk County Sheriff’s Office
Deputy Artur Artunyan, Deputy Joshua Brooks, Deputy Christopher Younger, Sergeant Erik Heikila, and Sergeant Michael Redding

On the morning of February 22nd, 2016 these individuals were on duty in the jail and responded to a suicide attempt by an inmate. The inmate had removed the blades from safety razors and used them to cut the vein/artery area of both his ankles. The inmate was combative with a weapon in his hands as they acted to prevent a suicide attempt. With blood everywhere and footing very slippery, the inmate had to be tasered before he was brought under control and aid could be provided. After getting control they then quickly changed gears and provided medical care. They all acted flawlessly as a team to stop the subject from bleeding out or going into shock. If it were not for the lifesaving efforts of these individuals coming together as a team, the subject would have perished.

Sheriff L. Shane Nelson and Deputy Caitlin Doshier, Deschutes County Sheriff 's Office

Sheriff L. Shane Nelson and Deputy Caitlin Doshier, Deschutes County Sheriff ‘s Office

Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office
Deputy Caitlin Doshier

On August 9, 2016, Deputy Doshier was waterskiing with family and friends at Lake Shasta, California. While waterskiing, Doshier’s friend, William Heiney, lost his balance and fell while crossing the boat’s wake. Heiney was paralyzed as a result of the fall, could not lift his head out of the water and stopped breathing while he floated in his life jacket. Doshier immediately recognized Heiney’s situation as life threatening, and dove from the back of the boat to render assistance. She retrieved Heiney and swam him back to the boat. Once on board, Doshier discovered Heiney was not breathing on his own, immediately took control, coordinated rescue efforts and began CPR. After several minutes of CPR, Heiney began breathing again without assistance. Doshier and others continued to monitor and provide aid to Heiney until Shasta County Sheriff’s deputies arrived to transport him to the hospital.

RN Melanie Menear, Physician Assistant Colin Storz, Deputy Justin Gabler, Deputy Kenneth Kaiser and Sheriff Pat Garrett, Washington County Sheriff 's Office

RN Melanie Menear, Physician Assistant Colin Storz, Deputy Justin Gabler, Deputy Kenneth Kaiser and Sheriff Pat Garrett, Washington County Sheriff ‘s Office

Washington County Sheriff’s Office
Deputy Kenneth Kaiser, Deputy Justin Gabler, Physician Assistant Colin Storz, RN Melanie Menear

On June 24, 2016, at about 3:30 p.m., a backup call was sent out from the Medical Observation Unit in the Washington County Jail. The call reported that an inmate had a self-inflicted wound and was bleeding profusely. Deputies Justin Gabler and Ken Kaiser worked diligently to stop the bleeding of the inmate, who had already become lethargic and unresponsive. The deputies applied two tourniquets and direct pressure with “combat gauze”; however, the bleeding still continued. While deputies worked on the bleeding, Physician’s Assistant Colin Storz and Registered Nurse Melanie Menear began administering oxygen and an IV while assessing the inmate, who initially had no blood pressure that they were able to obtain. The staff members worked together in stabilizing the inmate until she was transported to the hospital. It was later determined that the inmate had caused a laceration to an artery and would have died had it not been for the quick action of all involved and mental preparedness for a situation like this.

Sheriff Pat Garrett, Derek Kolstad and Deputy Todd Hanlon, Washington County Sheriff 's Office

Sheriff Pat Garrett, Derek Kolstad and Deputy Todd  Hanlon, Washington County Sheriff ‘s Office

Washington County Sheriff’s Office
Deputy Todd Hanlon and Citizens Derek Kolstad and Justin Aufdermauer

On April 9, 2016, at approximately 10:50 p.m., Deputy Todd Hanlon, who was off duty and traveling with his family, came across a motor vehicle crash that had just occurred in a rural part of Washington County. In addition to Deputy Hanlon, Derek Kolstad and Justin Aufdermauer had also stopped to render aid. Both of the vehicle passengers were unconscious with significant injuries and unable to extricate themselves. As a result of the crash, the engine compartment of the vehicle was also on fire. Mr. Kolstad opened the rear passenger door and removed a passenger from the back of the vehicle while heavy smoke filled the passenger compartment and billowed out the open door. Mr. Aufdermauer grabbed a dog from the vehicle, and then returned with his wife to help drag the passenger away from the now fully-engulfed vehicle. Deputy Hanlon had gone to the driver’s side and removed the unconscious driver from the vehicle, just as the flames expanded from the engine compartment to the passenger compartment and fully engulfed the car. Deputy Hanlon safely moved the driver away from the vehicle and rendered aid until emergency medical services arrived at the crash scene and transported the occupants to trauma centers in Portland, Oregon.

Dispatcher Brittney Ross, Sheriff Brian Wolfe and Deputy Wade Holom, Malheur County Sheriff 's Office

Dispatcher Brittney Ross, Sheriff Brian Wolfe and Deputy Wade Holom, Malheur County Sheriff’s Office

Malheur County Sheriff’s Office
Deputy Wade Holom and Dispatcher Brittney Ross

On Sunday, November 6, 2016, at about 6:00 a.m. the Malheur County Sheriff’s Office received a call of a 14-year-old male subject floating alongside a boat in the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The male subject had been preparing for an early morning duck hunt on the river. While preparing for the hunt, the young male subject was holding the boat to keep it from drifting off. The boat was started and was unknowingly in reverse causing the boat to move, and the current of the river caused the boat to float down the river. The boy tried to hold the boat but before he knew it, he was holding the boat in the middle of the river. Malheur County Dispatcher Deputy Brittney Ross took a call from the young man who had dialed 911 from his cell phone asking for help. Deputy Ross was able to keep the victim on the phone for about 35 minutes, talking him through the ordeal. Several times the young man expressed that he was so cold that he did not think that he could hold onto the boat any longer. Ross was able to encourage the victim to hold onto the boat to save his life. Marine Deputy Wade Holom immediately responded to the area. The outside temperature was about 38 degrees. Deputy Holom knew that he did not have time to respond 20 miles away to retrieve the Sheriff’s Office Marine boat, so he asked Ross to call a resident who lived near the river to use the citizen’s boat.

Deputy Holom was able to get the boat from the citizen and located the loose boat and victim which had gotten tangled up in some trees on the Idaho side of the Snake River. Deputy Holom was able to get the soaked victim into his boat. The victim was exhausted, cold, and suffering from hypothermia. Deputy Holom then transported the victim to the Ontario State Park where the victim was transported to a hospital.


Award for Valor – Awarded to a sheriff or deputy who in the line of duty gives their life or distinguishes themselves by the performance of an act of courage involving the risk of immediate danger to their life, while having knowledge of such risk and whose actions are above and beyond the call of duty.

Deputy Ryan Keys, Deputy Colin Pyle and Sheriff Bruce Riley, Linn County Sheriff 's Office

Deputy Ryan Keys, Deputy Colin Pyle and Sheriff
Bruce Riley, Linn County Sheriff ‘s Office

Linn County Sheriff’s Office
Deputies Ryan Keys and Colin Pyle

On March 25, 2016, Linn County deputies were investigating a possible stolen pickup which had been located in Albany, Oregon. Detectives had information that the subjects detained were associated with the stolen pickup and were suspects in a jurisdictional crime spree, with the possible threat of firearms.

Deputies gave commands to the occupants of the stolen pickup to exit with their hands up. The male suspect ignored the commands and was able to speed off out of the area. Deputy Keys and Deputy Pyle, both in a single patrol unit, began pursuit along with other law enforcement vehicles. At that time, Deputy Pyle was a recruit on Field Training and Evaluation Program (FTEP) and Deputy Keys was his field training officer. The male drove through several red lights, reaching speeds up to 100 MPH. The male drove his vehicle into a field where both he and a female passenger exited their vehicle and ran into a large orchard. Deputy Keys and Deputy Pyle were the first patrol unit on scene.

They exited their patrol vehicle to pursue the male and female on foot. Deputy Pyle was able to tackle the female and dislodge a handgun from her hand. Deputy Keys was going to deploy his taser, but the male turned with a 9mm handgun and started shooting at Deputy Keys. Deputy Keys then returned fire. Deputy Keys reported they were at such close range, that he could feel the percussion coming from the male’s gun. Deputy Pyle heard the first gunshot as he tackled the female. Looking up, Deputy Pyle saw the male shooting at Deputy Keys. Deputy Pyle sprang to his feet and began firing at the male. The male then began shooting at Deputy Pyle. Both Deputy Pyle and Deputy Keys were approximately 10-15 yards from the male suspect. Both Deputy Pyle and Deputy Keys simultaneously fired at the male. During the gun battle, Deputy Keys reported hearing rounds hitting the branches above him. Deputy Keys said he also knew a bullet had struck the ground in front of him because he felt the dirt spray up on him.

The male was shot four times before he dropped to a knee and complied with the deputy’s commands. First aid was immediately given to the male suspect, who was later taken to the hospital and treated for his injuries. The female suspect was not injured and was immediately taken into custody.


Lifetime Achievement Award – This award is given in recognition of an individual member’s lasting contributions to his office or the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association through committed and dedicated service.

Lieutenant Robert Clarke and Sheriff Bruce Riley, Linn County Sheriff 's Office

Lieutenant Robert Clarke and Sheriff Bruce Riley, Linn County Sheriff ‘s Office

Linn County Sheriff’s Office
Lieutenant Robert Clarke

Lieutenant Robert Clark is recognized for 35 years of service on the Linn County Dive Team. Being on a dive team is a unique position that requires specialized experience. Dive team members willingly swim into dark and murky water to recover property, vehicles and victims. The dangers they face are real and encountered often. They respond at all times of the year, in all types of weather and at all hours of the day. It takes a unique and special person to want to do this type of work, with very few people reaching 35 years of service on a specialized team.

Lieutenant Clark’s training records were found, dating back to 1981. Thank-you notes were located dating back to 1985. One, in particular, was from then-OSP Superintendent John C. Williams, thanking him and other team members for recovering the body of a homicide victim from the Santiam River.

Lieutenant Clark has helped neighboring counties numerous times over the years. One notable assist was during the Woodburn bombing investigation in December 2008. Lieutenant Clark coordinated with the FBI, OSP and several other agencies to recover evidence related to the bombing from the Santiam River. The weather was below freezing, with very cold water temperatures, but Lieutenant Clark and the Linn County Sheriff’s Office Dive Team did not hesitate to perform their duty to recover the evidence.

Linn County Dive Team members have come and gone through the years, but Lieutenant Clark remains highly active. He has been supervising the team since the mid-1990’s and has responded to most of the recoveries in Linn County since then. He is not only the supervisor for the dive team, but he continues to be a valuable diver and swift water operator. Lieutenant Clark has dedicated the last 35 years to helping Linn County citizens with closure during these tragic events. He has always sacrificed himself for the greater good of the community.

Chief Deputy Michael Shults and Retired Chief Deputy Tim Moore, Multnomah County Sheriff 's Office

Chief Deputy Michael Shults and Retired Chief
Deputy Tim Moore, Multnomah County
Sheriff ‘s Office

Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office
Retired Chief Deputy Tim Moore

For more than three decades, Chief Deputy Tim Moore has exemplified the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office vision of providing exemplary service for a safe, livable community. Time and again Chief Moore has shown a tremendous capacity to lead. Moore has had a profound effect on the policies, operational strategies, and future of the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office. Throughout the years, Moore has displayed extraordinary decision-making and planning capability. As a command officer, Moore has demonstrated his tremendous capacity to lead and advise deputies, sergeants, and other command officers and civilian staff. His highly effective leadership style is exemplified by his personable, honest approach. In the best of times, he has helped drive the department to a premier place among similar agencies. In the worst of times, he has done his best to keep the agency in a position to render the best service possible to the citizens. Moore has held a variety of position within the agency and he has developed many professional relationships.

His involvement in the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association increased, as well as involvement in legislative issues affecting the office of sheriff for not only Multnomah County but many others as well. Tim held an ongoing role and was a key instructor at the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association Command College, Deputy Academy, and the New Sheriffs Institute, where he instructed in public budgeting, large county administration issues and in-custody deaths. The tenure of Tim Moore will have a lasting effect on the corrections and law enforcement policy and practices of the office of sheriff in the State of Oregon.


Julie Miller, Oregon State Sheriffs' Asociation Kayla Derschon, Bend Riverhouse Jennifer Mannix, Deschutes County Sheriff ’s Office Trisch Clark, Deschutes County Sheriff 's Office Rebecca Sloper, Oregon State Sheriffs' Association

Julie Miller, Oregon State Sheriffs’ Asociation
Kayla Derschon, Bend Riverhouse, Jennifer Mannix, Deschutes County Sheriff ’s Office, Trisch Clark, Deschutes County Sheriff ‘s Office, Rebecca Sloper, Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association

Special Thanks

Nothing would have run smoothly without those behind the
scene. Special thanks go to those who worked so hard with
long hours and endless dedication to ensure the success of the
conference.

 

 

 

 


Jail Command Council

JAIL COMMANDER OF THE YEAR – Captain Lee Eby, Clackamas County
SUPERVISOR OF THE YEAR – Sergeant Jennifer Freeman, Clackamas County
DEPUTY OF THE YEAR – Deputy Jeremy Gilmore, Marion County

Enforcement Command Council

COMMANDER OF THE YEAR – Lieutenant Jeff Isham, Polk County
SUPERVISOR OF THE YEAR – Sergeant Lucas McLain, Harney County
DEPUTY OF THE YEAR – Deputy Doug Strain, Coos County
VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR – John Brown, Polk County

Parole and Probation Command Council

COMMANDER OF THE YEAR – Captain Jenna Morrison, Clackamas County
DEPUTY OF THE YEAR – Deputy Michelle Rickles, Clackamas County

Search and Rescue Advisory Council

MANAGER OF THE YEAR – Sergeant Corey Smith, Clackamas County
VOLUNTEERS OF THE YEAR – Matt Trager, Deschutes County and Todd Schechter, Benton County
PROGRAM OF THE YEAR – Curry County Search and Rescue

Civil Command Council Awards

CIVIL MANAGER OF THE YEAR – Chief Civil Deputy Debbie Zawerucha, Jefferson County
CIVIL DEPUTY OF THE YEAR – Civil Deputy Alan Muise, Deschutes County
SUPPORT STAFF OF THE YEAR – Geoff Cross, Washington County
CHL SUPPORT STAFF OF THE YEAR – Civil/Communication Deputy Erik Patton, Morrow County

OSSA President’s Recognition Award – This award is in recognition of an individual’s service for the current year to the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association or programs directly associated with OSSA. The award is given to Clackamas County Sheriff Craig Roberts, Lincoln County Sheriff Dennis Dotson, Washington County Sheriff Pat Garrett, Hood River County Sheriff Matt English, Multnomah County Chief Deputy Tim Moore, OSSA Executive Director John Bishop, Marion County Undersheriff Troy Clausen and Larena Myers.