Conservators of the Peace

OSSA Annual Conference and Awards Banquet

Front Row: Umatilla County Sheriff Terry Rowan, Jefferson County Sheriff Jim Adkins, Crook County Sheriff Jim Hensley, Lane County Sheriff Byron Trapp, Harney County Sheriff Dave Ward, Deschutes County Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, Malheur County Sheriff Brian Wolfe, Curry County Sheriff John Ward, Washington County Sheriff Pat Garrett, Clackamas County Sheriff Craig Roberts Middle Row: Gilliam County Sheriff Gary Bettencourt, Morrow County Sheriff Ken Matlack, Lincoln County Sheriff Dennis Dotson, Yamhill County Sheriff Tim Svenson, Clatsop County Sheriff Tom Bergin, Marion County Sheriff Jason Myers Back Row: Wallowa County Sheriff Steve Rogers, Wasco County Sheriff Rick Eiesland, Polk County Sheriff Mark Garton, Hood River County Sheriff Matt English, Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley, Douglas County Sheriff John Hanlin

Front Row: Umatilla County Sheriff Terry Rowan, Jefferson County Sheriff Jim Adkins, Crook County Sheriff Jim Hensley, Lane County Sheriff Byron Trapp, Harney County Sheriff Dave Ward, Deschutes County Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, Malheur County Sheriff Brian Wolfe, Curry County Sheriff John Ward, Washington County Sheriff Pat Garrett, Clackamas County Sheriff Craig Roberts Middle Row: Gilliam County Sheriff Gary Bettencourt, Morrow County Sheriff Ken Matlack, Lincoln County Sheriff Dennis Dotson, Yamhill County Sheriff Tim Svenson, Clatsop County Sheriff Tom Bergin, Marion County Sheriff Jason Myers Back Row: Wallowa County Sheriff Steve Rogers, Wasco County Sheriff Rick Eiesland, Polk County Sheriff Mark Garton, Hood River County Sheriff Matt English, Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley, Douglas County Sheriff John Hanlin

The Riverhouse Hotel and Convention Center was the setting for the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association 2015 Annual Conference and Awards Banquet. The event was held the week of December 7th with over 310 sheriffs and law enforcement professionals attending the conference, 345 attending the banquet, and 82 vendors. Election of officers was held and Malheur County Sheriff Brian Wolfe was elected President, Washington County Sheriff Pat Garrett was elected Vice President and Hood River County Sheriff Matt English was elected Secretary for the upcoming year.

At the conference, business meetings were held, presentations made and updates provided to attendees. All Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association councils met, elected new officers and provided updates to the sheriffs throughout the week. There were also updates given by representatives of the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST); Oregon State Police (OSP); Oregon Association of Chiefs of Police (OACP); Office of Adult Abuse Prevention and Investigations (OAAPI); Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF); US Marshal; Oregon Judicial Security; Office of Designated Approving Authority (ODAA); Office of Emergency Management (OEM); US Attorney’s Office; Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI); Special Olympics; Oregon Knowledge Bank; FBI Terrorist Screening Center; Washington State Sheriffs’ Association; and the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). Attendees were part of a training hosted by the Department of Public Safety Continuing Education Workshop featuring Lieutenant Colonel Kevin Sweeney, who spoke on handling pressure, innovation, being a teammate, prioritization and execution under pressure.

Life Saving Award – This award is given to individuals who perform an active, distinctive, successful saving of a life of another person. There must have been a strong possibility the person would have died if the action had not been taken. Events leading to the act are not carelessly caused by the person nominated for the award.

Sheriff Jeff Dickerson and Deputy Bill Goodwin, Columbia County Sheriff’s Office

Sheriff Jeff Dickerson and Deputy Bill Goodwin, Columbia County Sheriff’s Office

Columbia County Sheriff’s Office
Deputy Bill Goodwin

On May 23, 2015, Deputy Bill Goodwin pulled a 91-year-old female resident from her burning home in Rainier, Oregon. The home was subsequently destroyed by the fire. Deputy Goodwin heard the fire departments dispatched to the location and because he was in the area, he rushed to the scene. When he arrived he saw heavy smoke coming from inside the structure and heard the voice of the resident still inside. He crawled his way through heavy smoke and located the woman near the kitchen. She advised the deputy that she needed her walker and she was unable to escape the burning building without the assistance of the deputy. Deputy Goodwin and the woman were treated for smoke inhalation at the scene. Deputy Goodwin is a retired fire chief from the Columbia River Fire and Rescue. He’s been serving as a volunteer reserve deputy since 2009. Recently he has been employed as a part-time temporary deputy filling in for the Columbia County Enforcement Division’s depleted manpower following a deputy’s retirement in 2014. Deputy Goodwin also teaches CPR and first aid to the Sheriff’s Office and other county employees on a regular basis.

Sergeant Gordon Gill and Sheriff Byron Trapp, Lane County Sheriff’s Office

Sergeant Gordon Gill and Sheriff Byron Trapp, Lane County Sheriff’s Office

Lane County Sheriff’s Office
Sergeant Gordon Gill

On September 25, 2015, the Lane County Sheriff’s Office received a call involving shots fired. Sergeant Gill and other deputies responded to this call. As Deputies Glessner and Olson approached the residence, they could see two subjects engaged in a verbal dispute and one of the subjects was armed with a rifle. The male with the rifle then fired a round towards the other subject, immediately causing responding Deputies Glessner and Olson to announce themselves as police officers. The suspect with the rifle then turned and began firing at the deputies. Deputy Olson was shot and down before reaching cover, however both Deputy Glessner and Deputy Olson were able to return gunfire at the suspect. As the shooting started, Sergeant Gill arrived and observed that Deputy Olson was seriously injured. While deputies provided cover, Sergeant Gill broke cover and ran through open ground to reach Deputy Olson, dragging him to cover. After getting Deputy Olson out of the line of fire, not knowing exactly where the shooter was and with the seriousness of Deputy Olson’s injury, Sergeant Gill carried the deputy an additional 125 yards to the roadway where medics could reach them. This undoubtedly saved Deputy Olson’s life. In the midst of chaos Sergeant Gill stayed focused on the safety of his team, and his actions in no small way contributed to Deputy Olson making a full recovery.

Polk County Sheriff Mark Garton, Deputy Casey Gibson, Dallas Police Officers Jim Rodriquez and Colby Hamilton, Polk County Citizen Jeramiah Halleman

Polk County Sheriff Mark Garton,
Deputy Casey Gibson, Dallas
Police Officers Jim Rodriquez and
Colby Hamilton, Polk County
Citizen Jeramiah Halleman

Polk County Sheriff’s Office
Deputy Casey Gibson, Dallas Police Officers Colby Hamilton, and Jim Rodriquez, Polk County Citizen Jeramiah Halleman

On July 18, 2015, Polk County Deputy Shon Latty was involved in a motor vehicle crash while responding to a “code 3” request for cover by Independence Police and the Marion County Sheriff’s Office. These officers and deputies were fighting with the suspect. During his response, Deputy Latty’s vehicle struck a another vehicle which turned left in front of him, causing his vehicle to travel down a ditch and go airborne. Deputy Latty’s patrol vehicle suffered extensive damage and subsequently caught fire due to the dry grass under the vehicle. Deputy Latty was severely injured and was trapped inside his burning vehicle. Deputy Gibson, in coordination with Police Officer Rodriquez, attempted to suppress the flames. When Officer Rodriquez’s fire extinguisher ran out, Deputy Gibson realized the fire was not likely to be controlled and was spreading rapidly. Deputy Gibson made the observation that Deputy Latty, regardless of his injuries, needed to be removed from the vehicle. Officer Hamilton was able to break the vehicle’s door free so that Deputy Gibson and Officer Hamilton were able to remove Deputy Latty from the wrecked patrol vehicle. Citizen Halleman and Officer Rodriguez continued attempts to keep the fire suppressed with only a garden hose while Deputy Latty was freed. In less than four minutes the vehicle was consumed by fire. If it had not been for the actions of Deputy Gibson, Officer Rodriguez, Officer Hamilton and citizen Jeremiah Halleman, Deputy Latty would have succumbed to the fire, as his leg was pinned in the vehicle and he was unable to extricate himself due to a severely broken right arm and shoulder.

Barry Brennan and Corporal Brian Bryson, Klamath County Sheriff’s Office

Barry Brennan and Corporal Brian Bryson,
Klamath County Sheriff’s Office

Klamath County Sheriff’s Office
Citizen Barry Brennan

On April 2, 2015, Mr. Brennan was driving into the shared driveway to his residence and passing the neighbor’s residence. Mr. Brennan saw that his neighbor was yelling for help in the front yard of the residence. He then noticed that girls from the residence were performing CPR on a small child. It was learned that an 18-month-old child had fallen head first into a five gallon bucket of water that was used for watering livestock. Mr. Brennan had prior training in CPR and he took over by giving the baby four to five rescue breaths. He was able to resuscitate the baby so that the child began breathing on its own. The child was then transported to the hospital and subsequently made a full recovery. Mr. Brennan’s actions saved the 18-month-old child’s life.

Meritorious Service Award – This award is given for outstanding service over a period of years to their office or the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association.

Retired Sheriff Norm Neal and Sheriff John Hanlin, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office

Retired Sheriff Norm Neal and
Sheriff John Hanlin, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office

Douglas County Sheriff’s Office
Retired Sheriff Norm Neal

Sheriff Norm Neal has dedicated his working career to public service. He joined the U.S. Air Force and served in the Strategic Air Command for four years. He was discharged in 1959 at age 21 and immediately got a job with the Roseburg Police Department, assigned to parking duty. About the same time he also joined the Rural Fire Department as a volunteer “sleeper” and was one of the first responders to the August 7, 1959 Roseburg Blast. The 1959 blast was one of the greatest disasters in Roseburg history. A truck carrying a two ton load of dynamite and four and one-half tons of ammonium nitrate blew up, with the subsequent blast leveling eight city blocks.

Norm joined the Sheriff’s Office in 1963 and along with Retired Sheriff John Pardon, established the local SAR program. Retired Sheriff Neal was also a founding member of the Sheriff’s Office Dive Team. Some SAR reports from 1963 reference Norm as part of the operation. While a sergeant he managed the now-organized Douglas County Search and Rescue program. Sheriff Neal was elected twice to four-year terms, serving from 1981 to 1989. While serving as sheriff, Norm was instrumental in establishing the first SAR State Standards. He was also one of the sheriffs who pushed the man tracking program in Oregon.

Deputy Brian Rogers and Sheriff Pat Garrett, Washington County Sheriff’s Office

Deputy Brian Rogers and Sheriff Pat Garrett,
Washington County Sheriff’s Office

Washington County Sheriff’s Office
Deputy Brian Rogers

On April 25, 2015, Deputy Brian Rogers was on his way to work, traveling on Interstate 84 to the Washington County Sheriff’s Office East Precinct. Deputy Rogers noticed a blue Toyota traveling in the same direction as he was but was driving erratically. Deputy Rogers then watched the Toyota drift left and hit a concrete barrier separating the east and west travel lanes. The Toyota hit the barrier causing debris and sparks to come from the Toyota as it continued along the barrier. As Deputy Rogers watched, the driver-side vehicle tires went up on the top edge of the barrier and continued traveling at high speeds for approximately three to four blocks. Deputy Rogers applied his brakes to avoid colliding with the vehicle which then came off the barrier and started drifting back into the westbound traffic. Deputy Rogers noticed the driver appeared to be having a seizure. Deputy Rogers made a split-second decision that the Toyota needed to be stopped quickly to avoid a major collision with other vehicles on the highway. He accelerated his personal vehicle ahead of the Toyota to the point where the passenger side door of his vehicle was even with the left front bumper of the Toyota. Deputy Rogers then turned his vehicle sharply to the right and lightly applied his brakes, causing the Toyota to impact Deputy Roger’s vehicle. This caused the Toyota to slow down and eventually stop. Deputy Rogers exited his vehicle and directed another driver to call 911. He tried to gain access to the Toyota only to find the doors all locked or unusable due to the collision. The driver was actively seizing and unresponsive. Deputy Rogers used scissor jacks from his own vehicle to break a door window on the Toyota to gain entry and aid the driver. Deputy Rogers and another citizen entered the vehicle to assist the driver. The seizure lasted several minutes and the driver remained unresponsive for several more minutes. The driver was later transported to the hospital for treatment by Portland Fire and Rescue.

Distinguished Service Award – This award is given to a member who in the performance of his or her duties performs an act of outstanding or especially meritorious service while demonstrating selflessness and devotion to duty.

Reserve Lieutenant John Goodwin and Sheriff Craig Zanni, Coos County Sheriff’s Office

Reserve Lieutenant John Goodwin
and Sheriff Craig Zanni, Coos County Sheriff’s Office

Coos County Sheriff’s Office
Reserve Lieutenant John Goodwin

Reserve Lieutenant John Goodwin has been a strong friend and influential member of the Coos County Sheriff’s Office for more than five decades. Lieutenant Goodwin first joined the Coos County Sheriff’s Office Reserve Program in 1967, under then-Sheriff Charles Strawn. Reserve Lieutenant Goodwin has served in every aspect of the Reserve Program, even filling in for regular deputies’ positions when needed. Part of his requirement for new reserve deputies is to learn the historical aspect and core values of the Office of Sheriff. During a time when many people are looking for shorter work weeks, hours or early retirement, John Goodwin has looked for ways to give back to his community in a meaningful way. If not involved in one of the many local civic groups raising funds for the needy or putting together Christmas baskets for children in need, you will find him out volunteering time to assist at one of the local veterinary offices or local mortuary. Lieutenant Goodwin spends additional time in providing rides to veterans and local neighbors to medical checkups and appointments, and checking in at the Sheriff’s Office on a daily basis to ensure the reserve program is on track. All of this is accomplished without neglecting his friends, family or himself. Lieutenant Goodwin is a true example of what each of us should be trying to emulate. At age 73 when many men choose to hang their hat up, grab a pole and head to the river, Lieutenant Goodwin continues to serve as the oldest and most respected member of the Coos County Sheriff’s Office.

Deputy David McPherson and Sheriff Pat Garrett, Washington County Sheriff’s Office

Deputy David McPherson and Sheriff Pat Garrett, Washington County Sheriff’s Office

Washington County Sheriff’s Office
Deputy David McPherson

On May 16, 2015 at about 1:50 p.m., Deputy David McPherson, along with additional Washington County Sheriff’s Office deputies, responded to an assault-with-a-weapon call. The victim had accidentally shot himself in the leg with a 9MM pistol just above the left knee. Deputy McPherson was the first to arrive on scene and contacted the victim. He observed that the bullet had traveled down the victim’s leg and exited, which had created significant blood loss. Based upon Deputy McPherson’s recent tactical casualty care training, he quickly assessed the injury to the victim and determined the best course of action was the application of a tourniquet. Deputy McPherson applied his department-issued tourniquet to the victim’s leg, preventing further blood loss. The victim was then transported to OHSU’s trauma center for medical care where the attending physician stated that the tourniquet had save the victim’s life.

Detective John Shipley and Sheriff Pat Garrett, Washington County Sheriff’s Office

Detective John Shipley and
Sheriff Pat Garrett, Washington
County Sheriff’s Office

Washington County Sheriff’s Office
Detective John Shipley

Detective John Shipley has been employed with the Washington County Sheriff’s Office since June 1993. He has been a member of the Child Abuse Unit since June 2003. Shipley is recognized by his peers, supervisors, partner agencies and the Washington County District Attorney’s Office as a dedicated expert in the field of child abuse investigation. In his 12 years of dedicated service as a child abuse investigation detective, Shipley has investigated over 700 cases and maintains a constant caseload of between 15 to 25 child abuse cases, a lot of which are high profile. A couple examples of notable cases: a sex abuse investigation, which as the investigation progressed revealed a total of four victims, three of whom were children. The suspect was arrested, convicted, and received a 56 year prison sentence. In June 2013, Detective Shipley investigated a father and son case. After the investigation they arrested and convicted them, each getting a 25-year sentence in prison. Detective Shipley’s detailed investigations have helped remove those who prey on innocent children and help to ensure it will not happen again. This is a noble calling and one that he is good at. With these cases come the unthinkable acts that are being committed against our children, but Detective Shipley has found a way to stay focused on this difficult issue. Twelve years of working child abuse cases takes a toll on a person, but Detective Shipley has found a way to balance his work with his home life. Detective Shipley is a positive role model and mentor to our new detectives who have just started to work on child abuse cases. He not only helps them with their investigations but is very attentive to where they are mentally, especially if they are working difficult cases. The Washington County Sheriff’s Office is thankful for Detective Shipley’s hard work and dedication to the children of Washington County.

Distinguished Action Award – This award is given to a member who in the performance of his or her duties, performs an act involving personal danger or a highly credible, uncommon agency accomplishment which is performed under adverse conditions.

Newport Police Officers Brad Purdom and Kraig Mitchell with Lincoln County Sheriff Dennis Dotson

Newport Police Officers Brad Purdom
and Kraig Mitchell with
Lincoln County Sheriff Dennis Dotson

Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office
Sergeant Brian Cameron, Newport Police Chief Mark Miranda, and Newport Police Officers Brad Purdom and Kraig Mitchell

On December 26, 2014, officers from the Newport Police Department and Sergeant Brian Cameron from the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office responded to the Yaquina Bay Bridge to the report of a subject on the railing threatening to commit suicide. Officer Purdom was the first to arrive on scene. He found a 41-year-old male sitting on the railing near the center span of the bridge. The subject made very clear his intentions to jump off the bridge, and at one point the subject climbed over the rail and was on the outer Westside Bridge railing. Officer Mitchell, Police Chief Miranda and Sergeant Cameron arrived on scene to assist. The subject was engaged in conversation for 32 minutes, at which point he climbed back over the railing so that he was standing on the sidewalk. Police Chief Miranda and Officer Purdom developed a plan. When the subject again climbed over the railing and appeared to jump, Police Chief Miranda and Officer Purdom ran towards the subject, grabbing him during his attempted jump. They attempted to pull him back over the railing, however the subject grabbed a pipe on the outside of the railing and was using it to pull himself towards the water. Within seconds Officer Mitchell and Sergeant Cameron were able to assist. All three of the officers and the deputy worked together to pull the man back over the bridge. The quick actions of all four prevented this person from being able to plunge into the Yaquina Bay 138 feet below, ultimately saving his life.

Deputy Oscar Madrigal and Sheriff Ken Matlack, Morrow County Sheriff’s Office

Deputy Oscar Madrigal and Sheriff Ken Matlack, Morrow County Sheriff’s Office

Morrow County Sheriff’s Office
Deputy Oscar Madrigal

Morrow County Reserve Deputy Oscar Madrigal was off duty in Portland at a Cinco de Mayo festival when he observed a subject draw a pistol and shoot at two people, a male and female, striking the male subject. Deputy Madrigal drew his duty pistol from a concealed holster and prepared to defend other citizens and himself. He recognized the high concentration of people fleeing from the shooter which obstructed his ability to safely engage the male suspect with his firearm. Holstering his duty weapon, he chased after the armed suspect on foot and notified event staff of the situation, instructing them to call police. He continued to chase the suspect and on several occasions observed the suspect look back at him, causing him to seek a cover position. The suspect was observed boarding a MAX train which eventually traveled across the bridge. At this time he was contacted by a Portland police officer who requested he get in his car and continue to pursue the suspect. They followed the train to the next station where it was stopped. Deputy Madrigal identified the suspect as he exited the MAX train. Portland Police Bureau took the suspect into custody without further incident. The suspect was charged with Attempted Murder, Assault 1, and Unlawful Use of a Weapon. Reserve Deputy Madrigal, at considerable danger to himself, ran over a half mile after an armed suspect and was prepared to defend innocent bystanders and help apprehend the suspect. He showed excellent judgment and bravery in the situation and was instrumental in the quick apprehension of the attempted murder suspect.

Deputy Kevin Bigler and Sheriff Craig Roberts, Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office

Deputy Kevin Bigler and Sheriff Craig Roberts, Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office

Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office
Deputy Kevin Bigler

On June 8, 2015, Deputy Bigler responded to a domestic violence call involving a firearm. The suspect fled the scene and a vehicle pursuit ensued. The suspect stopped in a nearby field but would not comply with commands, fleeing the scene again in his vehicle. The suspect was tracked back to the victim’s home, where she was trying to leave in her own vehicle. Police then chased the suspect as he followed the victim’s vehicle. Ultimately the victim stopped on the side of the roadway where the suspect drove past her and parked in front. The suspect began to exit the vehicle, at which time Deputy Bigler placed himself in harm’s way. He intentionally rammed the suspect’s vehicle, which kept the suspect inside his truck. The video in this incident clearly shows the suspect, after being rammed, looking back for Deputy Bigler and displaying a handgun twice. Deputy Bigler chose to use deadly force, shooting at the suspect. The suspect was not struck by the rounds fired but then decided to comply with commands, and was taken into custody without further incident.

Sheriff John Hanlin

Sheriff John Hanlin

Umpqua Community College Shooting
Letter from Sheriff Hanlin

As I have said before, I have never been more proud of the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, the numerous other Sheriff’s Offices and all of the various local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies that supported us throughout the darkest days following the UCC shooting. I can’t begin to express my gratitude to ALL of you who have helped us in some way, offered to assist us, or just offered words of encouragement or sympathy. Whether it be a result of outstanding leadership training I have received through OSSA over the years or simply understanding how invaluable relationships can be with 35 other Sheriffs who are always willing to help one another, I cannot thank my fellow Sheriffs and OSSA enough for giving me the strength to work through this tragedy. In the aftermath of this tragedy, there are many unanswered questions. More answers will come in time and there will be opportunities for us all to learn and grow from this horrible tragedy. But for now, my clearest realization is the STRENGTH and HONOR provided by the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association. For that I thank you.

On October 1st, 2015, Douglas County Communications received a 911 call of an active shooter at Umpqua Community College. Dispatch quickly and calmly relayed the information to all Douglas County law enforcement agencies, as well as local emergency medical services. Numerous agencies throughout Douglas County responded and in less than 10 minutes from the initial 911 call, the shooter was engaged and stopped before further harm could be done. First responders arriving at the scene were witness to one of the largest mass murders in Oregon’s history. They also came upon a chaotic scene that included many who were injured or in shock. The first responders from the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office along with others, quickly began taking decisive action. Their roles included establishing control of the scene, clearing and securing classrooms and buildings on campus, assisting EMS with medical triage, and providing comfort to those wounded and dying. Although every first responder is to be commended for their actions, there are a few who have been singled out for their exceptional roles in this incident.

Deputy Ken Zarbano and Sheriff John Hanlin, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office; and Bureau of Land Management Ranger Tom Hill

Deputy Ken Zarbano and
Sheriff John Hanlin, Douglas County
Sheriff’s Office; and Bureau of Land
Management Ranger Tom Hill

Douglas County Sheriff’s Office
Deputy Ken Zarbano and Bureau of Land Management Ranger Tom Hill

Deputy Ken Zarbano and BLM Ranger Tom Hill are recognized for their assistance in Snyder Classroom #15, where they assisted not only with assessing the wounded and deceased, but provided critical care and immediate medical treatment to 34-year-old shooting survivor Amber McMurtrey of Roseburg, Oregon. Mrs. McMurtrey suffered severe gunshot wounds to her torso and upper arm. Both Deputy Zarbano and Ranger Hill kept McMurtrey calm as they applied bandaging and a tourniquet, while waiting for medical personnel to collect McMurtrey for transport to the hospital.

Reserve Deputy Tom Cross, Sheriff John Hanlin, and Sergeant Tarun Tillet, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office

Reserve Deputy Tom Cross,
Sheriff John Hanlin, and Sergeant
Tarun Tillet, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office

Douglas County Sheriff’s Office
Sergeant Tarun Tillet and Reserve Deputy Tom Cross Sergeant

Tarun Tillet and Reserve Deputy Tom Cross (also a Douglas County Communications Supervisor), are recognized for their assistance in Snyder Classroom #15, where they assisted with assessing the status of the wounded and deceased individuals, as well as assisting in transporting some of the wounded out of the classroom.

Bureau of Land Management Ranger Jake Szympruch and Sheriff John Hanlin, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office

Bureau of Land Management Ranger
Jake Szympruch and Sheriff John Hanlin, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office

Bureau of Land Management
Ranger Jake Szympruch

Finally, BLM Ranger Jake Szympruch is recognized for his actions in rendering aid and assistance to Christopher Mintz of Roseburg, Oregon, who was shot several times in the breezeway outside of Snyder Classroom #15. Following the shooting, Mintz was left lying in front of the classroom, unable to move. Ranger Szympruch stayed with Mintz until medical personnel arrived and assisted with preparing him for transport to the hospital.

Not to be overshadowed, in those brief chaotic minutes before first responders could arrive on scene, some students made critical decisions to intervene in a manner that proved a serious risk to themselves. Each student’s action, though different in nature, provided a form of distraction and interruption to the shooter, ultimately slowing down and altering his actions, saving lives.

Citizens Award for Valor – Awarded to a citizen who by their actions, gives their life or distinguishes themselves by the performance of an act of courage involving the risk of immediate danger to their life, while having knowledge of such risk.

Douglas County Sheriff John Hanlin (right) stands with family and friends accepting the posthumous award for Kim Saltmarsh Dietz

Douglas County Sheriff John Hanlin (right)
stands with family and friends accepting the
posthumous award for Kim Saltmarsh Dietz

Douglas County Citizen
Kim Saltmarsh Dietz (Posthumously Awarded)

After the first shot was heard by those in and around Snyder Hall, Kim Dietz, a student in the next door classroom known as Snyder Classroom #16, though unsure of what exactly was happening, clearly recognized that something was wrong and took action to investigate. According to some student accounts, the class heard what sounded like a loud bang, followed by something that sounded like a scream or disturbance. An uneasy feeling settled over the room as they tried to understand what had happened. They debated over whether or not a science lab experiment had gone wrong and someone was injured or perhaps something worse had happened. Whatever the reason, Kim Dietz felt the need to render assistance and chose to investigate. As Kim walked out of her classroom door and began to open the door of Snyder Classroom #15, the shooter immediately fired shots at her, striking her in the arm and torso. Remarkably, Kim was able to turn back into her classroom doorway and warn the other students that there was a shooter and to lock the door. It was after that moment that she collapsed in the doorway. Sadly, Kim passed away shortly after, despite the lifesaving efforts of her friend as well as paramedics.

Douglas County Sheriff John Hanlin (right) stands with family accepting the posthumous award for Treven Taylor Anspach

Douglas County Sheriff John Hanlin (right) stands with family accepting the posthumous award for Treven Taylor Anspach

Douglas County Citizen
Treven Taylor Anspach (Posthumously Awarded)

As the shooter continued on with his shooting spree in the classroom, one remarkable act of a young man is also recognized for having saved the life of a fellow classmate. After having just been fatally shot, Treven Anspach, in a selfless act of bravery, shielded his classmate with his body as he lay on the classroom floor. Subsequently that classmate, Lacey Scroggins, was able to escape the incident without injury.

Christopher Lee Mintz and Douglas County Sheriff John Hanlin

Christopher Lee Mintz and Douglas County Sheriff John Hanlin

Douglas County Citizen and Military Veteran
Christopher Lee Mintz

Chris Mintz, a student in adjacent room Snyder Classroom #14, is also to be commended for his actions during the campus shooting. After recognizing that a shooting was in progress, Chris assisted in evacuating his classroom away from the shooting and then made his way to the campus library where he alerted students and staff. Chris then had the presence of mind to leave the library through the emergency exit, setting off the fire alarm in order to continue to alert others of the danger. After leaving the library, Chris deliberately chose to return to Snyder Hall, specifically to warn others from the area until law enforcement could arrive. Seeing students hiding in Snyder Classroom #16, Chris posted himself at the doorway as a measure of protection for the room. He then alerted students in the parking lot to direct responding personnel to his location. Upon hearing Chris’ shouting, the shooter then stepped out of the classroom and began to shoot him. The shooter fired upon Chris five times, leaving him lay in front of the classroom doors, alive but unable to walk. Chris Mintz’s actions unquestionably saved lives by directing people away from danger, activating alarms to warn others, and identifying the location of the shooting, which allowed police to quickly respond and end the shooting spree.

Jail Command Council

JAIL COMMANDER OF THE YEAR – Captain Mary Lindstrand, Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office
SUPERVISOR OF THE YEAR – Deputy Jerry Shamoon, Washington County Sheriff’s Office
DEPUTY OF THE YEAR – Deputy Page Beutler, Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office
VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR – Reserve Deputy Eric Swanson, Tillamook County Sheriff’s Office

Enforcement Command Council

COMMANDER OF THE YEAR – Sheriff Terry Rowan, Umatilla County Sheriff’s Office
SUPERVISOR OF THE YEAR – Sergeant Todd Whitlow, Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office
DEPUTY OF THE YEAR – Deputy Ron Larson, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office
VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR – Dr. Michael Shertz, Washington County Citizen

Parole and Probation Command Council

SUPERVISOR OF THE YEAR – Sergeant Matt Meier, Marion County Sheriff’s Office
DEPUTY OF THE YEAR – Deputy Jordan Juster, Marion County Sheriff’s Office

Search and Rescue Advisory Council

COORDINATOR OF THE YEAR – Sgt. Sean Collinson, Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office
VOLUNTEERS OF THE YEAR – Jim Burge, Crook County Sheriff’s Office; Dave Prouty, Pacific N.W. Search and Rescue, Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office
PROGRAM OF THE YEAR – Coos County Search and Rescue

Civil Command Council Awards

CIVIL MANAGER OF THE YEAR – Chief Civil Deputy Joan Allen-Steineke, Curry County Sheriff’s Office
CIVIL DEPUTY OF THE YEAR – Civil Deputy Tammy Runyon, Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office
SUPPORT STAFF OF THE YEAR – Administrative Specialist Todd Ehlert, Washington County Sheriff’s Office
CHL SUPPORT STAFF OF THE YEAR – Civil Technician Melissa Montigny, Polk County Sheriff’s Office

OSSA President’s Recognition Award – This award is in recognition of an individual’s service for the current year to the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association or programs directly associated with OSSA. The award is given to Clackamas County Sheriff Craig Roberts, Lincoln County Sheriff Dennis Dotson, Washington County Sheriff Pat Garrett, Hood River County Sheriff Matt English, Multnomah County Chief Deputy Tim Moore, OSSA Executive Director John Bishop, Marion County Undersheriff Troy Clausen and Larena Myers.

Sheriff Larry Blanton, Sheriff Jim Hensley, Sheriff Tom Turner and Sheriff Bob Wolfe

Sheriff Larry Blanton, Sheriff Jim Hensley,
Sheriff Tom Turner and Sheriff Bob Wolfe

Life Member Award – This award is given in recognition of an individual member’s lasting contributions to the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association through committed and dedicated service. This award is given to Baker County Sheriff Mitch Southwick, Crook County Sheriff Jim Hensley, Deschutes County Sheriff Larry Blanton, Lane County Sheriff Tom Turner and Polk County Sheriff Bob Wolfe.

Julie Miller and Rebecca Sloper, OSSA Staff; Larena Myers, wife of Marion County Sheriff Jason Myers; Trisch Clark, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office; and Chris Fitzsimmons, Gilliam County Sheriff’s Office

Julie Miller and Rebecca Sloper, OSSA Staff; Larena Myers, wife of
Marion County Sheriff Jason Myers; Trisch Clark, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office; and Chris Fitzsimmons, Gilliam County Sheriff’s Office

Special Thanks Nothing would have run smoothly without those behind the scene. Special thanks go to those who worked so hard with long hours and endless dedication to ensure the success of the conference.

2017 Oregon Sheriffs’ Annual Conference

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Message from the OSSA President

washington-pat-garrettAs the newly elected president, I am honored to represent all 36 Oregon sheriffs.

The sheriff has historically been the chief executive officer of the county, and this is still true under Oregon law. Elected by you and answering directly to the voters, your sheriff can be an effective voice of the people in the serious work of protecting the community. OSSA enables us to work together to serve you best.

By way of introduction, I am in my second term as the Washington County Sheriff, where deputies serve over a half million residents across 727 square miles of rural areas, urban communities, and cities. Our deputies also operate the only county jail. While Oregon counties are diverse in terms of climate, population, and economic drivers, your sheriffs work together to solve problems and challenges that we have in common.

The sheriffs of America have always played a significant role in the history of our nation; in fact, the office of Sheriff was the first county office established in the United States. Also, the first person to read the Declaration of Independence publicly was Philadelphia Sheriff John Nixon in Pennsylvania in 1776.

I look forward to working together to strengthen the office of Sheriff and the communities we proudly serve. Thank you for your continued support of the men and women on shift every day to keep our diverse and proud communities safe.

Sincerely,
pat

Pat Garrett
President and Washington County Sheriff.

Jail vs. Prison … What’s the Difference?

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